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Scans Uncover Secrets of the Womb- Development Earlier Than Thought by Science

A new type of ultrasound scan has produced vivid pictures of a 12 week-old foetus "walking" in the womb. Click Here for Video

The new images also show foetuses apparently yawning and rubbing its eyes.

The scans, pioneered by Professor Stuart Campbell at London's Create Health Clinic, are much more detailed than conventional ultrasound. Professor Campbell has previously released images of unborn babies appearing to smile.

He has compiled a book of the images called Watch Me Grow. Conventional ultrasound, usually offered to mothers at 12 and 20 weeks, produces 2D images of the developing foetus.

Click and drag photo to resize. Script from The Java Script Source

These are very useful for helping doctors to measure and assess the growth of the foetus, but convey very little information about behaviour.

Complex behaviour

Professor Campbell has perfected a technique which not only produces detailed 3D images, but records foetal movement in real time.

He says his work has been able to show for the first time that the unborn baby engages in complex behaviour from an early stage of its development. Professor Campbell told the BBC: "This is a new science for understanding and mapping out the behaviour of the baby.

"Maybe in the future it will help us understand and diagnose genetic disease, maybe even conditions like cerebral palsy which puzzles the medical profession as to why it occurs."

The images have shown:

• From 12 weeks, unborn babies can stretch, kick and leap around the womb - well before the mother can feel movement
• From 18 weeks, they can open their eyes although most doctors thought eyelids were fused until 26 weeks
• From 26 weeks, they appear to exhibit a whole range of typical baby behaviour and moods, including scratching, smiling, crying, hiccuping, and sucking.

Until recently it was thought that smiling did not start until six weeks after birth. An hour long session using the new technology, which is not yet available on the NHS, costs £275.
Source: BBC News.com

Handedness develops in the womb.. July 04

The hand you favour as a 10-week-old fetus is the hand you will favour for the rest of your life, suggests a new study.

The finding comes as a surprise because it had been thought that lifelong hand preferences did not develop until a child was three or four years old.

A team led by Peter Hepper of the Fetal Behaviour Research Centre at Queen's University, Belfast in the UK reached this conclusion after studying ultrasound scans of 1000 fetuses.

In one study, nine out of 10 fetuses at 15 weeks' gestation preferred to suck their right thumbs. Hepper's team followed 75 of those fetuses after birth, and found that at 10 to 12 years old all 60 of the right thumb-suckers were right-handed, while 10 of the 15 left thumb-suckers were left-handed and the rest right-handed.

At 10 weeks old, even before they suck their thumbs, fetuses wave their arms about. A second study found that most prefer to wave their right arm, a preference that persisted until 24 weeks, after which the fetus is too cramped to move. Hepper reported the findings at the Forum of European Neuroscience in Lisbon, Portugal, earlier in July.

Reflex arc

Hepper is quick to point out that these observations do not show that the fetus can control its movements at such a young age. Nervous connections to the body from the brain are not thought to start developing until around 20 weeks' gestation.

In addition, at the same stages of development fetuses that lack a brain cortex, a condition called anencephaly, move their limbs in a similar way, also favouring their right arm over the left.

"There is no evidence that the brain has any control over these movements at this stage," says Hepper. "It's most likely to be a local reflex arc involving the spinal cord." He speculates that the fetus may have a preference for one side of its body simply because that side develops slightly faster.

The findings challenge the favourite theory of how handedness in humans develops. According to that theory, it is a side effect of brain lateralisation, in which one side of the brain predominantly handles certain functions, such as language. As the fetal scans show that handedness appears long before the brain has any control over limb movement, that theory cannot be correct.

Sensory connections

Instead, Hepper speculates that the reverse may be true: the fetus's body movements may somehow lead to the development of an asymmetrical brain. He points out that the sensory connections from the body to the brain develop before the connections that allow the brain to control the body's movement.

But Stephen Wilson, a developmental biologist at University College London, is sceptical. "The movements you see in a fetus don't have to be influencing brain asymmetries."

It is more likely, he says, that in the early fetus there is already a difference in gene activation between the right and left sides of the brain and that this leads to lateralisation.

Source: Laura Spinney, Lisbon, in NewScientist.com

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